zanetheaiden:

zanetheaiden:

date a boy with nice cheek bones

date a boy who has a good taste in clothes

date a boy with a great laugh

date a boy who’s hoodie you can borrow

date a boy with fantastic collarbones

date a boy who smiles constantly

date a boy with arms like damn

image

(via parafractal)

Long ago on the ship, she asked, “Why pyramids?”
He said, “Think of them as an immense invitation.”
She asks, “Are you cursed?” He says, “I think that I’m cured” 
Then he kissed her and hoped that she’d forget that question

(Source: Spotify)

Lover, please do not
Fall to your knees
It’s not
Like I believe in
Everlasting love

(Source: Spotify)

beatonna:

Tiny Toadstool Tesla on a Teacup (sorry)

beatonna:

Tiny Toadstool Tesla on a Teacup (sorry)

gingerandpickled:

misandragony:

thedailybeard:

fearsomebeardsome:

Robert & Charles
Me: Do you guys do something special to your beards or is the curl natural?
Robert: It’s all natural; just some leave in conditioner now and then.
www.ewenlewis.com

those curls on the dude on the left are downright enviable.

Oh my

My body is ready

gingerandpickled:

misandragony:

thedailybeard:

fearsomebeardsome:

Robert & Charles

Me: Do you guys do something special to your beards or is the curl natural?

Robert: It’s all natural; just some leave in conditioner now and then.

www.ewenlewis.com

those curls on the dude on the left are downright enviable.

Oh my

My body is ready

(via backstagebethy)

reblog if you are a NERD who loves DRAGONS

(Source: peachdoxie, via maladydee)

melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)
My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.
But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness.  
So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.) 
One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”
Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)

My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.

But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness. 

So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.)

One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”

Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

(via npr)